In the United States, the usage, growth or possession of marijuana is illegal at the federal level, but states are permitted to create marijuana laws of their own. Some states legalized the use of marijuana for at least some purposes several decades ago. Others only allow its use for specific purposes, or they have decriminalized it. Other states, however, have held firm with their anti-cannabis stance and continue to invoke harsh penalties against those who are caught violating their laws. Here is a breakdown of the current marijuana laws by state.

Alabama

Alabama has restrictive laws regarding the possession, sale, and growth of marijuana, but since 2014 has permitted CBD oil for limited medical use, explicitly when prescribed as a treatment for debilitating epileptic symptoms. If you are found guilty of marijuana possession with the intent to use it for recreational purposes, you could spend up to a year in jail and face up to $6,000 in fines. The intention to sell marijuana in Alabama is a felony that is punishable by up to two years in jail and up to a $30,000 fine. The punishment for selling the drug to a minor is even more severe. Depending on the circumstances surrounding a marijuana cultivation charge, you could face a maximum sentence of life in prison as well as a fine of up to $60,000. Keep in mind that even the possession of paraphernalia is illegal and is punishable by up to a year in jail and up to $6,000 in fines, and the sale or trafficking of gear is considered a felony.

Alaska

Alaska has a long-standing reputation for protecting the rights of marijuana users. Its state supreme court ruled in 1975 that its citizens could legally possess small amounts under the right privacy clause of its constitution. In November 2014, voters approved the legalization of recreational-use marijuana, and it officially became legalized in February 2015. Currently, only adults who are at least 21 years old are permitted to carry 1 ounce of marijuana. They cannot smoke it in public, however, and those caught doing so will receive a modest $100 fine. Also, those who are older than 21 can own six marijuana plants.

Arizona

Arizona legally permits the use of marijuana for medical purposes if prescribed by a doctor for treatment of qualifying conditions. Patients may grow marijuana in some instances, but they cannot be in possession of more than 2.5 ounces at any given time. The possession, sale, growth or trafficking of marijuana, as well the possession of paraphernalia, are all felonies in Arizona. The maximum fine for any charge regardless of the amount of marijuana involved is $150,000. If you possess less than 2 pounds, you could face between four months and two years in jail. If you are caught selling less than 2 pounds of marijuana, you could face up to three years and nine months in jail. Keep in mind that more significant amounts of marijuana and more severe crimes come with more extended incarceration periods.

Arkansas

Arkansas is one of the newer states to permit the medical use of marijuana. Under specific and limited circumstances, individuals are allowed to use up to 3 ounces within a two-week period. Otherwise, those caught in illegal possession of fewer than 4 ounces will be charged with a misdemeanor and will face a fine up to $1,000 and up to one year in prison. Selling less than 14 grams of marijuana is a misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. Other charges involving larger quantities of marijuana for recreational use, delivery and trafficking are felonies. There are also penalties and fines associated with the ownership and use of different types of paraphernalia.

California

California became the first state to legalize the use of medical marijuana in 1996, and it authorized the recreational use of the drug in 2016. However, only adults may use marijuana, and possess only 1 ounce or less; any amount over 1 ounce is a misdemeanor charge. The maximum fine is $500, combined with a possible sentence of up to six months in jail depending on the amount of marijuana in possession. Residents are allowed to gift up to 28.5 grams of this drug to another person, but the sale of even a small amount to an adult is a misdemeanor. The sale of any amount to a minor is a felony punishable by between three to seven years in jail. Residents may also grow up to six plants; any more constitutes a misdemeanor punishable by a $500 fine and up to six months in jail.

Colorado

In 2000, Colorado legalized the medical use of marijuana for specific conditions and with limitations. In 2012, the state passed a law that legalized recreational-use marijuana, allowing possession of up to 1 ounce for any resident who is at least 21 years old. It’s illegal to smoke pot in public in Colorado, and you can grow up to six plants for personal use. There are laws regarding possession of larger amounts. Misdemeanor possession is the charge for up to 12 ounces of marijuana, and this is punishable by up to $5,000 in fines and up to 18 months in jail. There are also separate and increasingly severe punishments in place for larger amounts of marijuana.

Connecticut

In 2012, Connecticut passed a law that legalized medical marijuana use for a lengthy list of qualifying conditions and for up to a one-month supply at a time. Without a prescription, possession of less than a half-ounce is a civil offense that may result in a maximum fine of $500. Possession of up to 4 ounces is a misdemeanor for a first offense, punishable by up to one year in prison and up to a $1,000 fine depending on the amount.  Possession of larger amounts, subsequent offenses, cultivation, and trafficking are all felonies in Connecticut. The maximum sentence a court may impose for a marijuana charge in this state is a fine of up to $100,000 and up to 25 years in prison.

Delaware

Since 2011, patients with a doctor’s prescription have been able to possess up to 6 ounces of marijuana, and the state also has decriminalized personal use of small amounts. Possession of up to 1 ounce results in a civil charge with up to a $100 fine. However, possession of more than one ounce is a felony offense that is punishable by up to 25 years in jail depending on the amount of the drug in possession. There are additional charges and punishments associated with the sale and cultivation of the drug as well as with owning related paraphernalia.

District of Columbia

In November 2015, approximately 65 percent of voters in the District of Columbia voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. Currently, you may carry up to 2 ounces of marijuana, but you cannot smoke it in public. You are also permitted to grow up to six plants on your own. Also, up to 1 ounce of marijuana may be gifted to a friend. Keep in mind that possession of more than 2 ounces by an adult is a misdemeanor that is punishable by up to six months in jail and up to a $1,000 fine.

Florida

Since 2016, CBD was legalized only for use as a treatment for children with epilepsy, but legal medical use has since been expanded to cover other conditions for individuals of all ages. Otherwise, the possession or sale of up to 20 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor charge with a possible sentence of up to a $1,000 fine and up to one year in jail. The possession or sale of larger amounts is felony charges with more substantial penalties. Keep in mind that the conviction of a Floridian on a marijuana charge could also result in the suspension of the individual’s driver’s license for up to one year.

Georgia

While Atlanta has decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana by adults, most parts of the state strictly enforce marijuana laws. In 2015, Georgia legalized the use of medical marijuana as a treatment for specific conditions, and these patients could possess up to 20 ounces of cannabis oil with a limited amount of THC in it. Possession of less than 1 ounce for non-medical purposes is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in prison and up to a $1,000 fine. Possession of more substantial amounts and the cultivation of and intention to sell any amount are all felony offenses that have severe penalties.

Hawaii

Since 2000, Hawaii has legally permitted medical use of marijuana when prescribed for specific conditions. Patients may only possess up to 4 ounces at a time, and they may grow up to seven plants at their home. Individuals who possess up to a pound of marijuana or who intend to deliver or sell as much may get charged with a misdemeanor, for which the punishment may be up to one year in prison and up to a $2,000 fine. The possession, delivery or sale of more significant amounts, as well as cultivation or the use of paraphernalia, are all felony offenses met with harsh punishments in Hawaii.

Idaho

All forms of marijuana are prohibited in Idaho, including cannabis oil. Misdemeanor crimes relate to public intoxication involving marijuana, being in a location where marijuana is grown or stored, being in a place where it is sold or used, use or possession of drug-related paraphernalia and personal use possession of fewer than 3 ounces. You may receive a felony charge for possession of more than 3 ounces, the intent to sell or distribute any amount, the cultivation of any number of plants and selling or making any paraphernalia. Furthermore, if you get caught with any amount of marijuana in your vehicle, the vehicle may be seized.

Illinois

Illinois officially legalized the medical use of marijuana in 2013, and it allows those with a written prescription for specific conditions to possess up to 2.5 ounces over the course of 14 days. The state also decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana for recreational use, which means that adults caught in possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana may be charged civilly and may face a fine up to $100. Possession of between 10 and 30 ounces is a misdemeanor crime punishable by up to one year in jail and up to a $2,500 fine for a first offense. That holds true for the sale of up to 10 ounces as well. Any subsequent charges or any charges involving larger amounts of marijuana are felony offenses.

Indiana

Indiana has strict anti-drug laws that are enforced by harsh penalties. Depending on the amount of marijuana that you are in possession of and your subsequent charges, you may receive a misdemeanor charge punishable by up to 180 days in jail and a $1,000 fine, or you may receive a felony charge with up to 2.5 years in jail and up to a $10,000 fine. Selling and growing marijuana are viewed equally in the eyes of the law. Depending on the amount you are cultivating or selling, you may receive a misdemeanor charge with a punishment of up to one year in jail and up to a $5,000 fine, or you may receive a felony charge with a sentence of up to six years in jail and up to a $10,000 fine. Severe penalties are also in place for owning, selling or making paraphernalia and even for withholding information about drug activities of others. Keep in mind that the conviction of any drug charge in Indiana will result in the suspension of your driver’s license.

Iowa

Iowa permits the medical use of marijuana for treatment of intractable epilepsy, and only in the form of CBD oil. The possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor charge in this state. Depending on the number of previous convictions, you may receive a sentence of up to two years in prison and a fine of up to $6,250. Subsequent convictions may also result in mandatory drug treatment. The sale, distribution, and cultivation of marijuana in Iowa result in similar penalties. For offenses involving 14 grams or less, the charge is a misdemeanor crime punishable by up to two years in prison and up to $6,250 in fines. Charges involving larger amounts are felonies that are punishable by much longer sentences and larger fines.

Kansas

Kansas has no tolerance for any marijuana use, cultivation or distribution. If caught in possession of fewer than 450 grams, you may receive a misdemeanor conviction that is punishable by up to a $1,000 fine and up to six months in jail for even a first offense. Possession of larger amounts, classified as an intention to sell, can result in a felony conviction with up to a $100,000 fine and up to 42 months in prison. Growing between four and 50 plants is a felony that could result in up to 83 months in jail and up to a $300,000 fine. Cultivating larger numbers of plants results in an even more substantial penalty. There are also numerous misdemeanor and felony charges related to marijuana paraphernalia.

Kentucky

Kentucky has permitted the medical use of non-intoxicating CBD oil as a treatment for intractable epilepsy since 2014. All other forms of marijuana are prohibited, and this holds true for possession, sale, and cultivation. Personal possession of fewer than 8 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor charge punished by up to 45 days in jail and up to a $250 fine. If you get caught with more than 8 ounces of marijuana, you will face a charge for the sale or distribution of marijuana. Depending on the amount of marijuana in your possession, your felony charge may subject you to a sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

Louisiana

Louisiana permits the medical use of marijuana with a prescription from a doctor. Without a prescription, a first offense possession of up to 14 grams is a criminal charge punishable by up to 15 days in jail and up to a $300 fine. Possessing up to 60 pounds is a non-defined criminal charge that is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $30,000. A first offense charge of distribution or cultivation of any amount of marijuana may be punishable by up to 30 years in prison and up to a $50,000 fine. Also, the conviction of any drug-related charge will result in the loss of driving privileges for a period of between 30 days and one year.

Maine

Since 1999, Maine has allowed medical marijuana use for qualifying conditions. Patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces with a written note from a doctor suggesting that the patient may benefit from its use. The recreational use of marijuana is permitted as well, and individuals who are 21 years old or older may possess up to 2.5 ounces legally. They may also grow up to six plants in their home. Public use of marijuana is punishable by a $100 fine. It is not legal to own or use paraphernalia in Maine, which may impose a fine of up to $300 for offenders. There are charges for possession of larger amounts of marijuana, for the sale of any quantity of marijuana to others without a license and the cultivation of more than six plants. Depending on the severity of the charge, individuals may face up to 10 years in jail and receive a fine of up to $20,000.

Maryland

Medical use of marijuana is legal in Maryland, and recreational possession of small amounts decriminalized. Specifically, patients with a written prescription from a doctor for the treatment of specific qualifying conditions may possess up to a 30-day supply of marijuana. Recreational use possession is a civil offense that is punishable by a $100 fine, but public use of marijuana is punishable by up to a $500 fine. Possession of less than 50 pounds without the intent to distribute is a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in prison and up to a $1,000 fine. The intent to distribute up to 50 pounds of marijuana is a felony that is punishable by up to five years in prison and up to a $15,000 fine. There are additional penalties in place for larger possession and distribution amounts, cultivation, possession of paraphernalia and more.

Massachusetts

Recreational use of marijuana has been legal in Massachusetts since November 2016. Adults who are at least 21 years old may carry up to 1 ounce of marijuana or up to 5 grams of concentrate outside of their home. They may also have up to 10 ounces inside their home and also may grow up to six plants inside the house. Massachusetts also allows you to give up to 1 ounce of marijuana to another adult.  Exceptions to the possession limits are in place for those who have a medical prescription for marijuana use for specific conditions. With a prescription, you may possess up to a 60-day supply. Outside of these amounts and permissible uses, misdemeanor or felony charges are possible and punishable by both jail time and fines. Also, your car could get seized, and you can lose driving privileges.

Michigan

Michigan permits the medical use of marijuana for specific qualifying conditions. There are no medical dispensaries in the state, but patients are permitted to grow up to 12 plants in a secure location in their home. Patients may carry up to 2.5 ounces legally. Otherwise, possession of any amount is a misdemeanor that results in incarceration of up to one year and up to a $2,000 fine. Possession in a park is either a misdemeanor or a felony, and this is punishable by up to two years in jail and up to a $2,000 fine. Be aware that Michigan views marijuana usage as a separate crime from possession. It is a misdemeanor that is punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $100. Depending on the amount of marijuana involved in a distribution charge, the result may be a misdemeanor charge or a felony charge with as much as 15 years in jail and up to a $10 million fine. Be aware that there are also laws regarding the cultivation of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia. Any marijuana charges will result in the temporary loss of driving privileges.

Minnesota

Minnesota has permitted medical use of marijuana for several years. Patients may have up to a 30-day supply of non-smokable marijuana for qualifying conditions only. Also, possession of up to 42.5 grams or less is a misdemeanor charge that is punishable by a fine of up to $200. Possession of any larger amount is a felony offense, for which you may face up to 30 years in prison and up to a $1 million fine depending on the amount of marijuana that you hold. It is also illegal to grow marijuana and to possess paraphernalia in Minnesota.

Mississippi

Mississippi was one of the first states to decriminalize the possession of a small amount of marijuana, but decriminalization is only for the first offense. With the first conviction for possession of 30 grams or less, you will receive a fine of up to $250. For subsequent offenses, you may face jail time and larger fines. Possession of more than 30 grams and the sale of marijuana are felonies with substantially harsher penalties. Keep in mind that Mississippi has legalized the medical use of marijuana. Specifically, it permits patients with intractable epilepsy to receive treatment with a prescribed cannabis extract.

Missouri

In 2014, Missouri legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes. It can specifically be used to treat intractable epilepsy when prescribed by a doctor, and patients may only possess up to 20 ounces of cannabis extract at a time. The illegal possession of marijuana in Missouri is punishable as a misdemeanor for amounts less than 35 grams, and the punishment may be up to one year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine for even a first offense. Possession of more significant quantities, as well as the sale of any amount of marijuana, are felony crimes. Growing marijuana and owning or selling paraphernalia are also illegal. If you are convicted of a marijuana charge and are under the age of 21 years old, your driver’s license may be suspended.

Montana

Medical marijuana was legalized in Montana in 2004 for the treatment of specific conditions. Patients may possess up to 1 ounce, and they may grow up to four mature plants or up to 12 seedlings at a time. Otherwise, the first offense for possession of fewer than 60 grams is a misdemeanor crime that is punishable by up to six months in jail and up to a $500 fine. Possessing more than 60 grams with or without the intent to sell or distribute marijuana is a felony offense. With grave offenses involving a large quantity of drugs, the punishment may be life in prison. Growing marijuana is also a felony that is punishable by at least two years in jail and a fine of up to $50,000. There are additional charges and penalties associated with paraphernalia, possession or sale to minors or near a school, possession on a train and more.

Nebraska

Nebraska has not legalized the medical or recreational use of marijuana, but it has decriminalized personal possession of minimal amounts. That means that an individual caught with an ounce or less will be charged with an infraction and will be fined up to $300 for a first offense. Subsequent offenses of this small amount will result in a misdemeanor possession charge, a fine of up to $500 and possible jail time. If you get caught with more than a pound of marijuana in your possession or if you attempt to sell or cultivate even the smallest amount, you will get charged with a felony. There are also infraction and misdemeanor charges related to drug paraphernalia.

Nevada

In 2016, Nevada legalized the recreational use of marijuana. Adults who are at least 21 years old may have up to an eighth-ounce of cannabis concentrate or up to an ounce of marijuana. You can also gift up to 3.5 grams of concentrated marijuana or up to an ounce of the cannabis flower to a person who is legally old enough to possess it. If you hold more than the legal limit, you can be charged with a misdemeanor and receive a fine of up to $600. Also, if you use marijuana in a public place or even if you possess it in public, you may be fined $600 and charged with a misdemeanor. Gifting more than a single ounce of marijuana is classified as distribution, which is a felony offense that may be punished by up to four years in prison and a fine up to $5,000. Furthermore, you may only grow up to six plants at home and only if you live farther than 25 miles from a dispensary. A cultivation violation is a felony. Nevada also has special medical-use laws related to those who have a qualifying condition and written documentation from a physician. Patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces, and they may qualify for special exceptions to the cultivation limits.

New Hampshire

In 2013, New Hampshire legalized the medical use of marijuana for a lengthy list of qualifying conditions. With a doctor’s prescription, patients may possess up to 2 ounces. Otherwise, the possession of any amount of marijuana will result in a misdemeanor charge with up to one year in prison and a maximum fine of $350. Paraphernalia charges are also a misdemeanor, and they are punishable by up to one year in jail and a maximum fine of up to $2,000. Regardless of the amount, the sale or intent to sell marijuana is a felony charge punishable by between three and 20 years of jail time for a first offense and a maximum fine of between $25,000 and $300,000, with harsher penalties for subsequent convictions. Individuals who are under the age of 21 years old and who violate any marijuana laws will have their license suspended for up to five years.

New Jersey

New Jersey’s medical marijuana law permits patients with an approved medical condition and a doctor’s order to legally obtain up to 2 ounces of marijuana per month. Outside of medical usage, you may be charged with a disorderly person charge if you have 50 grams or less of marijuana. This charge comes with a sentence of up to six months in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000. Possession of more than 50 grams is a general crime punishable by up to 18 months in jail and a fine of up to $25,000. Distribution and cultivation, also considered general crimes in New Jersey, can subject you to punishments directly related to the amount of the drug in question. Individuals who are under the age of 17 and who violate any of these laws may have their driver’s license suspended for up to two years.

New Mexico

Since 2007, the medical use of marijuana has been legal for patients with serious qualifying conditions in New Mexico. The medical marijuana law permits qualifying patients to possess 6 ounces of marijuana and to grow up to 16 plants at home at a time. However, only four plants should be mature at any one time. Criminal possession of fewer than 8 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor and may be punished by with between 15 days and one year in jail as well as a fine between $100 and $1,000. Possessing more than8 ounces, distributing any amount and growing any amount are felony offenses punishable by a lengthy period in jail and sizable fines. Drivers convicted of any marijuana law violations may also face a driver’s license revocation.

New York

Patients with a qualifying condition may legally get prescribed up to a 30-day supply of non-smokable marijuana products in New York. The state also has decriminalized non-medical possession of up to 25 grams, making this a civil charge with a fine of $100 for the first offense and increasing penalties for additional offenses. It is a misdemeanor to possess marijuana in public view and to possess between 25 grams and 8 ounces. Holding more than 8 ounces, selling more than 25 grams, and trafficking are felony crimes that are punished by at least several years in jail and hefty fines. Minors who are charged with marijuana crimes may lose their driver’s license for up to six months.

North Carolina

Partial decriminalization of marijuana in North Carolina means that you may be charged with a misdemeanor and face a fine of up to $200 if you possess up to one-half ounce. If you have up to 1.5 ounces, you will also get charged with a misdemeanor, for which you may be subject to up to $1,000 in fines and up to 45 days in jail. Possession of more substantial amounts results in a felony charge. The sale of any quantity of marijuana is a felony in North Carolina. With the sale of fewer than 10 pounds, you will spend at least four to eight months in jail and pay a fine of up to $1,000. Larger amounts come with increasingly severe penalties. Cultivating marijuana and any activities involving minors are felonies as well.

North Dakota

North Dakota has not legalized or decriminalized marijuana use or possession in any way. Possession of less than an ounce of marijuana or possession or manufacturing of drug-related paraphernalia is misdemeanor charges that are punishable by jail time and monetary fines. It is important to note that all other marijuana law violations in North Dakota are considered felony offenses. For example, possessing between 1 ounce and 500 grams of marijuana is punishable by up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. A simple sale conviction involving any amount of marijuana results in a felony charge with up to 10 years in prison and up to $20,000. Sales involving minors or that occur close to schools have very stringent penalties. Any conviction of a marijuana law violation results in a mandatory drug addiction screening. Minors may also face a driver’s license suspension for up to six months.

Ohio

Ohio does not permit the medical use or recreational use of marijuana, but it has partially decriminalized the possession of small amounts of marijuana. For example, possession of up to 100 grams is a misdemeanor violation that is only punishable by up to a $150 fine. Possessing between 100 and 200 grams of marijuana is also a misdemeanor, and it is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and a fine of up to $250. Possession of larger amounts is a felony. Ohio considers the distribution of up to 20 grams of marijuana to be a gift, which is a misdemeanor charge for the first and second offense followed by a felony charge for subsequent offenses. The sale, distribution or trafficking of larger amounts are serious felony offenses in Ohio. All drivers who violate any marijuana laws may face a driver’s license suspension for a period up to five years.

Oklahoma

While Oklahoma has a medical marijuana law in place, the law only legalizes CBD oil for the treatment of pediatric epilepsy. All other uses are prohibited. The possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor crime that is punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. The sale of even the smallest amount of marijuana in Oklahoma is a felony that may be punishable by up to life in prison and a fine up to $20,000 for quantities less than 25 pounds, with higher fines imposed for more substantial amounts. All drivers convicted of any marijuana law violations in Oklahoma may have their license suspended for a period between six months and three years.

Oregon

Oregon legalized medical-use marijuana in 1998, and approved it for recreational use in 2015. Public use of marijuana is a misdemeanor that is punishable by up to $1,000. However, adults who are at least 21 years old may possess up to an ounce outside of their home and up to 8 ounces in their home. Possessing larger amounts in public or at home is a misdemeanor charge regardless of the quantity, but the amount in your possession will affect the punishment. You may legally grow up to four plants at home. Growing between five and eight plants is a misdemeanor and producing more than eight plants is a felony. Manufacturing any amount is a felony in Oregon. Charges and penalties for distribution or delivery depend upon the amount of the drug and whether or not compensation was received. Keep in mind that drug convictions involving more than one ounce of marijuana may result in the automatic suspension of your driver’s license.

Pennsylvania

All uses of marijuana in Pennsylvania are currently prohibited. For personal possession of any amount, you will get charged with a misdemeanor that is punishable by between 30 days and one year in jail and a fine between $500 and $5,000. Sale or distribution of two pounds are more is a felony offense, and the sale or distribution of smaller amounts is a misdemeanor. Cultivating even one plant is a felony offense in Pennsylvania, and it is punishable by a fine up to $15,000 and up to five years in prison. Paraphernalia charges are misdemeanors in this state. All related convictions also subject you to suspension of your driver’s license.

Rhode Island

In 2006, Rhode Island legalized the medical use of marijuana, and it has also decriminalized non-medical possession of small amounts. The medical-use law states that patients with qualifying medical conditions may possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana as prescribed by a doctor. They may also have up to 12 mature plants and up to 12 additional seedlings that are growing indoors. Recreational users who possess less than an ounce of marijuana receive a civil charge and a fine of up to $150. Those holding between 1 ounce and 1 kilogram face a misdemeanor charge for which they can get sentenced up to one year in jail and a maximum fine of $500. Possession with the intent to distribute is a serious felony charge that comes with a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison or up to life in prison. The court may also impose a fine of between $100,000 and $500,000. Cultivation for non-medical use is a felony regardless of the number of plants. If you are caught in possession of marijuana while driving, your license may get suspended for six months.

South Carolina

The medical marijuana bill that South Carolina passed in 2014 permits patients with three specific medical conditions to be treated with cannabis extract when prescribed by a physician. All other uses are prohibited. The first offense for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in jail and up to $200 in fines. A subsequent possession charge involving less than an ounce of marijuana is punishable by up to a year in jail and up to $2,000 in fines. Possession of more substantial amounts, classified as sale or trafficking, are felonies subject to lengthy jail sentences and hefty fines. Cultivating even one plant in South Carolina is a felony offense, for which you may receive up to five years in prison and up to $5,000 in fines. Growing 100 plants are more is punished with a mandatory minimum sentence of 25 years in prison. Paraphernalia possession in South Carolina is a civil offense that results in a maximum fine of $500.

South Dakota

South Dakota has not legalized the recreational or medical use of marijuana, and it has not pursued decriminalization. The possession of up to 2 ounces and the sale of less than one-half ounce are both considered misdemeanor crimes, and they are punishable by up to one year in prison and up to $2,000 in fines. The possession of paraphernalia is also a misdemeanor that is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and up to a $500 fine. Possession of 2 ounces or more and the sale of a half-ounce or more are felonies. Depending on the exact charge and the amount of marijuana involved, you may get between one and 15 years in jail, and fined between $2,000 and $15,000.

Tennessee

Tennessee permits the use of non-intoxicating CBD oil for the treatment of intractable seizures only. All other uses are prohibited and are criminal actions. Possession of a half-ounce or less is a misdemeanor charge that is punishable by up to a year in prison and a maximum fine of $500. Possession of paraphernalia is also a misdemeanor with a punishment of up to one year in jail and a maximum fine of $2,500. Possessing more than one-half ounce of marijuana in Tennessee is considered possession with the intent to distribute and is a felony. Depending on the amount of marijuana involved in a sale or intent to distribute charge, you may face between one to 60 years in jail, and you may get fined between $5,000 and $200,000. The cultivation of any plants is also a felony, and the punishment is based on the number of plants involved.

Texas

Medical use and recreational use of marijuana are both prohibited in Texas. Possession of up to 4 ounces and the sale of 7 grams or less are misdemeanor crimes, and they are both punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $4,000. The possession or sale of larger amounts of marijuana are felonies, and the smallest mandatory minimum sentence is 180 days of imprisonment and a $10,000 fine. The maximum penalty in extreme cases is life in prison and a hefty fine. The possession of drug paraphernalia or the first offense of the sale of equipment are misdemeanor crimes, and other paraphernalia charges are felonies. Anyone convicted of any drug offense in Texas faces immediate automatic suspense of the driver’s license.

Utah

Utah was the first state to allow the medical use of CBD oil for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Beyond this medical-use, possession of less than an ounce of marijuana may be punishable as a misdemeanor by up to six months in prison and by a maximum fine of $1,000. Possession of up to 1 pound of marijuana is also a misdemeanor that is punishable by up to one year in jail and a maximum fine of up to $2,500. The possession of larger amounts of marijuana and the sale of any quantity are felony crimes. The minimum sentence is five years in jail and a $5,000 fine. The possession or sale of paraphernalia are both misdemeanor charges. Any drug-related convictions in Utah will result in a mandatory six-month suspension of your driver’s license.

Vermont

Marijuana, permitted for medical use in Vermont since 2007, was legalized for recreational use in 2018. For both types of usage, residents are allowed to possess up to 2 ounces. You may also grow up to two mature plants and up to seven seedlings in an enclosed area in your home. Public use of marijuana is prohibited and is punishable by a fine.

Virginia

Virginia permits the use of non-intoxicating CBD oil for the medical treatment of intractable epilepsy only. All other uses are strictly prohibited. This state will charge you with a misdemeanor if you possess up to one-half ounce of marijuana. Depending on the number of subsequent convictions, this may be punishable by up to one year in jail and a maximum fine of $2,500. Possession of any more substantial amounts, considered possession with the intent to distribute, is a felony. All intent to distribute, sale and trafficking charges are felonies, and the punishments may range from a mandatory minimum sentence of one year in prison to life behind bars and a fine that ranges from $1,000 to $1,000,000. Paraphernalia charges are a misdemeanor that may also be punishable by jail time and a fine. A six-month suspension of your driver’s license is possible with any drug-related conviction in this state.

Washington

Adults who are 21 years old or older may possess up to an ounce of marijuana legally, but there is $100 fine for publicly using it. Residents can lawfully possess more substantial amounts with a medical prescription for qualifying conditions for a doctor. Otherwise, holding between 1 ounce and 40 grams is a misdemeanor, and the possession of larger amounts is a felony. The sale, distribution or cultivation of any quantity of marijuana is a felony, and the minimum punishment is five years in jail and a $10,000 fine. It is also a misdemeanor to advertise the sale of paraphernalia.

West Virginia

Beginning in 2019, West Virginia will issue identification cards to patients with qualifying conditions for the medical use of marijuana. Patients may get prescribed a 30-day supply of cannabis-infused products, such as CBD oil. Recreational-use possession is a misdemeanor in West Virginia regardless of the amount, and this crime is punishable by up to six months in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000. The sale of any amount of marijuana is a felony that is punishable by a minimum of one year in jail up to a maximum of five years, and there may also be a $15,000 fine. Trafficking is also a felony with similar punishments. Any paraphernalia charges are classified as a misdemeanor with a minimum sentence of six months in jail and a possible fine. If you use your vehicle to commit a felony drug offense, you will also face mandatory license revocation.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin permits the use of CBD oil without psychoactive effects for seizure disorders, with no limit on the amount a patient may possess. For recreational use, the first offense of possession of any amount is a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000. Subsequent possession charges are felonies that may subject you to up to 3.5 years in jail and a maximum fine of $10,000. The sale, delivery or cultivation of any amount of marijuana is a felony offense. At the lower end of the spectrum, these offenses are punishable by up to 3.5 years in prison and a maximum fine of $10,000. At the highest end of the spectrum, the offenses are punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a maximum fine of $50,000. All related paraphernalia charges are misdemeanors. Convictions of any of these charges may result in a six-month driver’s license suspension.

Wyoming

In Wyoming, qualifying patients with intractable epilepsy may be prescribed CBD oil as a treatment. Patients are not permitted to grow or produce their own oil. Recreational-use of marijuana is a criminal offense. If you are under the influence of this drug in public, you will get charged with a misdemeanor. This crime is punishable by up to six months in jail and a maximum fine of $750. Possession of fewer than 3 ounces of marijuana is also a misdemeanor, and it is punishable by up to a year in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000. Selling or distributing any amount of marijuana is a felony for which you may get up to 10 years in jail and be required to pay a maximum fine of $10,000. Growing your own plants is a misdemeanor, and the punishment is a sentence of up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. Paraphernalia charges are unclassified offenses, and they may be punished by up to six months in jail and up to a $750 fine.

Laws regarding the recreational and medical use of marijuana vary by state. More than that, they are quickly changing in some states. Before you decide to use marijuana for recreational or medical purposes, it is important to understand the laws in your area.

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